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Humanities

elements of art (informational) – YouTube Make a list with the elements and prin

elements of art (informational) – YouTube
Make a list with the elements and principles of art.
Explain three.
*Keep this list handy, as you will use it to analyze paintings every week.
Pick any painting of your choice and try a few of these elements/principles to analyze it. Have fun 🙂
Please attach a picture of the painting and tell us why you chose this one specifically.

Categories
Humanities

Stand by Me Discuss the meaning of this song and the artistic form of the video.

Stand by Me
Discuss the meaning of this song and the artistic form of the video.
Analyze the message you see in the way the video is done.
Provide your opinion about this artwork.

Categories
Humanities

In this task, you will write an analysis of one work (suggested length of 3–6 p

In this task, you will write an analysis of one work (suggested length of 3–6 paragraphs total). Choose one work from one time period in the list of accepted works below:
Note: the one work you choose MUST be selected from only one of the periods in the list below.
Classical Period:
Sappho [Like the very gods] ca. 7th century B.C.E. (poetry)
Plato, Apology, ca. 399 B.C.E. (philosophy)
Hadrian, Pantheon, ca. 118-125 C.E. (architecture)
Phidias, Athena Parthenos, ca. 438 B.C.E. (model of the lost original sculpture)
Renaissance:
William Shakespeare, Sonnet 116, “Let me not to the marriage of true minds admit impediments,” 1609 (poetry)
Christopher Marlowe, “The Passionate Shepherd to His Love,” ca. 1599 (poetry)
Sandro Botticelli, Primavera, ca.1470, (tempera on panel)
Michelangelo, PietĂ , 1498-1499 (sculpture)
Josquin des Prez, Mille Regretz (French Chanson), c. 1521
Thomas Weelkes, Sing We at Pleasure (English madrigal), c. 1598
Enlightenment:
Jonathan Swift, “A Modest Proposal” 1729 (satirical essay)
Mary Wollstonecraft, Excerpt from Chapter 9 from A Vindication of the Rights of Woman 1792 (essay)
NeoClassical:
Angelica Kauffmann, Cornelia Pointing to her Children as Her Treasures, 1785, oil on canvas
Jacques-Louis David, Oath of the Horatii, 1784, oil on canvas
Classical Music:
W. A. Mozart, Piano Concerto No. 20 in D Minor, K. 466 – “Romanze” (second movement), 1785
Joseph Haydn, Symphony No. 94 “Surprise Symphony” (second movement), 1792
Romanticism:
John Keats, “When I Have Fears That I May Cease to Be,” 1818 (poem)
Harriet Jacobs, Chapter 1 from “Incidents in the Life of a Slave Girl,” 1861 (autobiography)
Théodore Géricault, The Raft of the Medusa, c. 1819, oil on canvas
Francisco de Goya, Saturn Devouring His Son, 1820-1823 (mural transferred to canvas)
Franz Liszt, Hungarian Rhapsody No. 2, 1847
Beethoven, Piano Concerto no. 5 in E flat major, Op. 73 (Emperor Concerto), 1809-1811
Realism:
Guy de Maupassant, “The Necklace,” 1884 (short story).
Kate Chopin, “Désirée’s Baby” 1893 (short story)
Rosa Bonheur, The Horse Fair, 1852-1855, oil on canvas
Henry Ossawa Tanner, The Banjo Lesson, 1893, oil on canvas
Scott Joplin, Maple Leaf Rag, 1899 (piano musical composition)
Claude Debussy, Clair de lune (from the Suite Bergamasque), 1905, orchestral (originally a piano suite)
Use the link near the bottom of this page to access direct links to the acceptable works listed above. Once you have selected one of the accepted works from the list above, you will research the work, the life of the author/artist, and the period. You will then be ready to create your analysis. This process of analysis will require you to discuss the events or innovations that define the historical period when the work was created, analyze a theme or stylistic characteristic of the period that is reflected in the work, and finally analyze the work’s or author’s/artist’s/composer’s contribution to the humanities.
REQUIREMENTS
Your submission must be your original work. No more than a combined total of 30% of a submission and no more than a 10% match to any one individual source can be directly quoted or closely paraphrased from sources, even if cited correctly. An originality report is provided when you submit your task that can be used as a guide.
You must use the rubric to direct the creation of your submission because it provides detailed criteria that will be used to evaluate your work. Each requirement below may be evaluated by more than one rubric aspect. The rubric aspect titles may contain hyperlinks to relevant portions of the course.
A. Analyze the acceptedwork by doing the following:
1. Describe the historical events or innovations that characterize the period in which the work was created (suggested length of 1–2 paragraphs).
2. Analyze how this work reflects a theme or stylistic characteristic from its period (suggested length of 1–2 paragraphs).
3. Analyze the work’s or author’s/artist’s/composer’s contributions to the humanities (suggested length of 1–2 paragraphs).

B. When you use sources to support ideas and elements in a paper or project, provide acknowledgement of source information for any content that is quoted, paraphrased or summarized. Acknowledgement of source information includes in-text citation noting specifically where in the submission the source is used and a corresponding reference, which includes the following points:
• author
• date
• title
• location of information (e.g., publisher, journal, website URL)

C. Demonstrate professional communication in the content and presentation of your submission.
File Restrictions
File name may contain only letters, numbers, spaces, and these symbols: ! – _ . * ‘ ( )
File size limit: 200 MB
File types allowed: doc, docx, rtf, xls, xlsx, ppt, pptx, odt, pdf, txt, qt, mov, mpg, avi, mp3, wav, mp4, wma, flv, asf, mpeg, wmv, m4v, svg, tif, tiff, jpeg, jpg, gif, png, zip, rar, tar, 7z
RUBRIC
A1:PERIOD CHARACTERIZATION
NOT EVIDENT
The submission does not provide a descriiption of the historical events or innovations that define the selected period.
APPROACHING COMPETENCE
The submission provides an inaccurate descriiption of the historical events or innovations that define the selected period.
COMPETENT
The submission provides an accurate descriiption of the historical events or innovations that define the selected period.
A2:WORK ANALYSIS
NOT EVIDENT
The submission does not provide an analysis that describes how the work explores a particular theme or stylistic characteristic from its period.
APPROACHING COMPETENCE
The submission provides an analysis that inaccurately describes how the work explores a particular theme or stylistic characteristic from its period.
COMPETENT
The submission provides an analysis that accurately describes how the work explores a particular theme or stylistic characteristic from its period.
A3:HUMANITIES CONTRIBUTION
NOT EVIDENT
The submission does not provide an analysis of the work’s or author’s/artist’s/composer’s contributions to the humanities.
APPROACHING COMPETENCE
The submission provides an inaccurate analysis of the work’s or author’s/artist’s/composer’s contributions to the humanities.
COMPETENT
The submission provides an accurate analysis of the work’s or author’s/artist’s/composer’s contributions to the humanities.
B:SOURCES
NOT EVIDENT
The submission does not include both in-text citations and a reference list for sources that are quoted, paraphrased, or summarized.
APPROACHING COMPETENCE
The submission includes in-text citations for sources that are quoted, paraphrased, or summarized and a reference list; however, the citations or reference list is incomplete or inaccurate.
COMPETENT
The submission includes in-text citations for sources that are properly quoted, paraphrased, or summarized and a reference list that accurately identifies the author, date, title, and source location as available.
C:PROFESSIONAL COMMUNICATION
NOT EVIDENT
Content is unstructured, is disjointed, or contains pervasive errors in mechanics, usage, or grammar. Vocabulary or tone is unprofessional or distracts from the topic.
APPROACHING COMPETENCE
Content is poorly organized, is difficult to follow, or contains errors in mechanics, usage, or grammar that cause confusion. Terminology is misused or ineffective.
COMPETENT
Content reflects attention to detail, is organized, and focuses on the main ideas as prescribed in the task or chosen by the candidate. Terminology is pertinent, is used correctly, and effectively conveys the intended meaning. Mechanics, usage, and grammar promote accurate interpretation and understanding.
WEB LINKS
LibGuides: Introduction to Humanities: Task Works

Categories
Humanities

Submit a 500-word reflection paper in which you: explore the ways in which you c

Submit a 500-word reflection paper in which you:
explore the ways in which you consume, react to, and engage with popular culture.
reflect on how studying popular culture has changed or reinforced your beliefs and values and whether or not your choices about popular culture will change.
discuss the extent to which your consumption of and attitude about popular culture may or may not change.
analyze how you might affect social change through popular culture creation, consumption, and critical analysis.
Support your assertions by making at least two references to the Learning Resources, using proper APA format.
* MY ONLY OPINION ON THIS IS THAT POP CULTURE SHOULD NOT BE CONTROLLED BY THE GOVERNMENT.
Learning Resources: https://www.chronicle.com/article/george-lucass-force/

Critical Media Project


Categories
Humanities

Hello! I need to just complete some makeup Discussion questions. Here are 6 ques

Hello! I need to just complete some makeup Discussion questions. Here are 6 questions. Please make sure to asses every question. MOST IMPORTANTLY, some of the questions are in first person and asses personal opinion. Please feel free to write whatever opinion. I just need them in for completion. Thanks for all of your help!! Attached in files are the 6 questions.

Categories
Humanities

https://oll.libertyfund.org/page/sumner-the-forgotten-man-1883 After reading th

https://oll.libertyfund.org/page/sumner-the-forgotten-man-1883
After reading this late-1800s essay, please share your reaction to Sumner’s Philosophy.